Novels can—should—mirror the non-coherence of the world. Rarely do I relate when a writer utilizes narrative structure to force reconciliation. For me, truth cracks open in the places where things do not cohere. That’s how life is. Rupture and incoherence of parts, which stream into understanding. I guess my intention with the form—what I think the form can do—is stream what doesn’t fit into a frequency of some kind, not a plot of some kind. I would prefer to let the reader deal with holding together what fits because it is in one book, and not because the writer tried to make parts cohere in a symphonic logic. But all writers say some version of that, that they want books to match the rupture and incoherence of life. The question is how much do you really allow for it. I hope for more of it in my own work, in the future. Rachel Kushner (via shimmer)

(via bodegamag)

poetsandwriters:

From “Trouble Behind Glass Doors” in poet Walter Bergen’s collection, Trouble Behind Glass Doors: Poems. BkMk, University of Missouri-Kansas City: 2013.

poetsandwriters:

From “Trouble Behind Glass Doors” in poet Walter Bergen’s collection, Trouble Behind Glass Doors: Poems. BkMk, University of Missouri-Kansas City: 2013.

(via bodegamag)

Months of looking at the manuscript and saying, ‘This is wrong—but what’s wrong?’ I ask myself, ‘If this book were a dream, it would be a dream of what?’ But when I’m asking this I’m also trying to believe in what I’ve written, to forget that it’s writing and to say, ‘This has taken place,’ even if it hasn’t. The idea is to perceive your invention as a reality that can be understood as a dream. The idea is to turn flesh and blood into literary characters and literary characters into flesh and blood. — Philip Roth (via mttbll)

(via bodegamag)

althistories:

Robby the Robot poses with co-star Anne Francis in this shot for 1956’s Forbidden Planet, a brilliant and visually stunning retelling of Shakespeare’s The Tempest. 

althistories:

Robby the Robot poses with co-star Anne Francis in this shot for 1956’s Forbidden Planet, a brilliant and visually stunning retelling of Shakespeare’s The Tempest. 

Made with Paper

Made with Paper

2 Lovesexy (Taken with Instagram at HQ1618)

2 Lovesexy (Taken with Instagram at HQ1618)

Dusty Roads (Taken with Instagram at HQ1618)

Dusty Roads (Taken with Instagram at HQ1618)

ruin (Taken with Instagram at HQ1618)

ruin (Taken with Instagram at HQ1618)